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Rechtsreferendariat

Application Closing Date - fortlaufend

Job Start Date - fortlaufend

Duration - min. 3 Monate

Location - Berlin

Das internationale Sekretariat von Transparency International (e.V.) mit Sitz in Berlin sucht fortlaufend engagierte Rechtsreferendare / Rechtsreferendarinnen, die ihre Wahlstation im Kontext einer Nichtregierungsorganisation absolvieren möchten. Die Station sollte von mindestens dreimonatiger Dauer sein.

Im Rahmen des Rechtsreferendariats werden Sie mit vielfältigen juristischen Sachverhalten konfrontiert. Im Vordergrund stehen dabei Vertrags-, Urheber- und Strafrecht, aber auch datenschutzrechtliche Themenstellungen und arbeitsrechtliche Fragen.

Sie erhalten die Möglichkeit, einen Einblick in den aktuellen Stand der Korruptionsbekämpfung weltweit und in die tägliche Arbeit einer der führenden Nichtregierungsorganisationen auf diesem Gebiet zu erhalten.

Interesse am Thema Korruptionsbekämpfung, sehr gute analytische und kommunikative Fähigkeiten in sowohl Englisch (Organisationssprache) als auch Deutsch in Wort und Schrift, sowie eine sorgfältige und eigenverantwortliche Arbeitsweise werden vorausgesetzt.

Gerne nehmen wir Ihre vollständigen Bewerbungsunterlagen (Anschreiben, Lebenslauf, Zeugnisse) mit Angabe Ihrer Verfügbarkeit per E-Mail an [email protected] (max. 5 MB) entgegen. 

Wir freuen uns auf Ihre Bewerbung!

The international fight against corruption needs your expertise, your skills and experience, and your passion for social justice.

From our secretariat in Berlin and in more than 100 national chapters, Transparency International seeks professionals and volunteers with exceptional talent and commitment to join our efforts and make a contribution to a better world.

 

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