Transparency International Chairman Eigen opens dialogue with the China Society of Administrative Supervision

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International (TI), the anti-corruption organisation, has initiated a dialogue with a leading association in China, the China Society of Administrative Supervision (CSAS) to explore ways in which TI can assist China to combat the abuse of public office for private gain.

TI Chairman Peter Eigen was accompanied by TI Vice Chairman Tunku Abdul Aziz, TI Board Member Fritz Heimann and Professor Thomas Lee. Eigen noted on his return from China that: "It is important that we understand the ways in which the Chinese view critical issues of corruption, curbing corruption and transparency and that we explore ways in which TI can bring its expertise to assist the Chinese people. Our "National Integrity Source Book" has been translated into Chinese, which can assist anti-corruption efforts, as can our work on "Integrity Pacts" in the procurement area and other approaches that we have developed. At the same time, we can learn from a variety of initiatives now moving ahead in China, including those that involve programmes supported by multilateral and bilateral official aid agencies."

Peter Eigen invited the CSAS to attend TI's upcoming international conference cum Annual General Meeting that will involve representatives from TI National Chapters in more than 80 countries and that takes place in Ottawa, Canada, from September 29-30, 2000. Dr. Eigen and members of TI's Board held intensive talks in Beijing and they agreed with their Chinese hosts to issue the following joint statement:

"The China Society of Administrative Supervision (CSAS) and Transparency International have conducted three days of productive discussions in Beijing. Recognising that corruption is a problem in all countries, and that combating corruption in the global economy requires international co-operation, CSAS and TI believe that developing a programme of co-operation could be mutually beneficial.

Located in Beijing, CSAS is a non-governmental institution, devoting itself to the research of administrative supervision theory and practice.

TI Chairman Peter Eigen stated that he was impressed by the determined and systematic approach of the Chinese Government to combating corruption. He invited the CSAS to attend TI's annual general meeting in Ottawa in September and make a presentation on its own work.

CSAS President Peng Jilong stated that, according to China's own situation, the Chinese government has adopted a series of effective measures and approaches to combating corruption, and attached great importance to international co-operation and to learning from the good experience and modus operandi of other countries in combating corruption."


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