Money laundering allegations must be investigated; government must end harassment of civil society

Issued by Transparency Maldives



At a time when countless allegations are being levelled against top government officials, parliamentarians as well as heads of independent institutions for having been involved in one of the biggest corruption scandals in the country, the investigative documentary ‘Stealing Paradise’ by Al Jazeera and the subsequent news articles published on their website have given reason for extreme concern.

The accusations made in this documentary clearly indicate a lack of sincerity and blatant abuse of power. They were sourced from evidence acquired through text messages from three mobile phones belonging to the former Vice President Ahmed Adeeb as well as testimony from some of the key accused in the case brings forth several areas of grave concern.

These accusations include:

As a result of these grave accusations, Transparency Maldives calls on the State to pay close heed to the following recommendations.

These recommendations can only be achieved by ensuring that legislations formulated and amended at the Parliament are inclusive of public opinion and sentiment and by ensuring that such legislation does not violate the constitutional rights of the people. In addition, it is imperative that crucial state institutions like the Auditor General’s Office, the Anti-Corruption Commission as well as the Prosecutor General’s Office act in a timely manner to investigate and take necessary action against the cases of grand corruption being revealed with adequate evidence.

Transparency Maldives believes that the widespread impunity in cases of corruption and the abuse of power is a consequence of the powers of the state being held in the firm grip of a few powerful people. As a result fundamental rights are curtailed and the developmental pace of the country is also greatly decelerated.

We call on all state institutions to take necessary and effective measures to halt the vicious spread of corruption to the highest levels of power. We also call on the political parties to insist on integrity at all levels in order to rid the country of this systemic corruption and to do everything possible to save state property by closing all possible avenues leading towards corruption. It is a collective as well as an individual responsibility to hold elected representatives to account in order salvage the country from the bleakness that is corruption.


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