Chinese journalist and Angolan human rights activist win Transparency International’s Integrity Award

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Transparency International is proud to announce Chinese journalist Luo Changping and Angolan human rights activist and journalist Rafael Marques de Morais as the winners of the 2013 Integrity Award.

The two winners exemplify in every way the courage and determination of the many individuals and organisations confronting corruption around the world, often at great personal risk. Past winners, including Sri Lankan journalist Lasantha Wickremantunge and Russian lawyer Sergei Magnitsky, had their lives taken from them as they struggled against corruption.

Past Integrity Award winners have done everything from tracking down the billions of dollars hidden by dictators to shedding light on financial scandals and prosecuting organized crime networks.

Since being launched in 2000, the Integrity Awards have honoured journalists, government officials and civil society leaders, all united by a shared belief: corruption can be challenged.

“Our two winners this year represent everything our international movement stands for as we work to end the abuse of power, secret dealings and bribery,” said Huguette Labelle, Chair of Transparency International. “Everyone challenges corruption in their own way and Marques and Luo are an inspiration for the way they chose to combat this scourge.”

Working in a difficult environment, Chinese journalist Luo Changping courageously exposed corruption via his personal blog.

When the respected financial magazine Luo works for was reluctant to print the name of a high-ranking official accused of illegal financial dealings, he bravely decided to publish the full allegations, including the official’s name. His naming of the official, Liu Tienan, eventually led to a government investigation resulting in Liu’s dismissal from the party and removal from public office in 2013.

Rafael Marques de Morais was imprisoned in 1999 after denouncing his government for corruption and embezzlement in a newspaper article. In spite of his detention and ill-treatment, Marques continued with his efforts to reveal the corrupt practices of those in power. He has written extensively on the trade in conflict diamonds and corruption in the oil industry. Through his blog Maka Angola he has become the authoritative voice on corruption in his country.

A committee of 11 individuals from across the world that have been active in the anti-corruption movement for many years serves as the jury for the awards. Nominations for this year’s award were submitted by the public and Transparency International chapters around the world.

The two winners will receive their award later today at a ceremony after Transparency International’s conference in Berlin marking the 20th anniversary of its founding.

For daily global anti-corruption updates follow us on Twitter at or on Facebook at

For live updates and pictures from the ceremony follow #TIat20 on Twitter.

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Note to editors

For more details on the Integrity Awards ceremony in Berlin, click here. For more information about the Integrity Awards, click here.


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