Brazilian journalists win 2012 Latin American Investigative Journalism Award

Work revealed illicit enrichment scheme leading to the fall of former Chief of Staff Antonio Palocci

Issued by Transparency International Secretariat



Translations: PT


Folha de Sao Paulo journalists Andreza Matais, José Ernesto Credendio and Catia Seabra have won the 2012 Latin American Investigative Journalism Award for a series of stories that led to the resignation of the President of Brazil’s Chief of Staff.

The award is given out yearly by the (Press and Society Institute, IPYS) and Transparency International (TI). For the 2012 edition, 209 investigative pieces published in the press, radio, television and Internet, coming from 19 countries in the region, were nominated.

The series of stories that brought down Dilma Rousseff’s Chief of Staff were developed by the team of Brazilian journalists in “a classic piece of investigative journalism,” the competition judges said. The reporters started with a simple and isolated piece of information: the purchase of a luxury apartment in Sao Paulo, and began an investigation that led to the discovery an illicit enrichment scheme. A few days after the publication, Antonio Palocci resigned from his position as Chief of Staff.

The reporters received an award of US$15,000 during a special ceremony that was part of the (COLPIN), which took place in Bogota, Colombia from 12 – 15 October.

Second and third place

Members of the jury, comprised of Gerardo Reyes and Tina Rosenberg (United States), María Teresa Ronderos (Colombia), Fernando Ruiz (Argentina) and Marcelo Beraba (Brazil), also announced the names of the journalists that won second and third place, receiving an award of US$10,000 and U$5,000, respectively.

“Condemned Children”, by Jose Luis Costa and Adriana Irión from Zero Hora, Brazil was awarded with the second place. This multi-year effort culminated in a reconstruction of the history of each of the 162 young people that were held in a detention centre for minors. Several of them ended up dying violently or went back to lives of crimes after their detention. The journalists’ investigation sped up the announcement by the national government to promote reforms for the treatment of youngsters in detention centres.

The third place was given to the series “Black Fishing” by Milagros Salazar from IDL Reporteros, Peru. This effort made extensive use of databases, street level investigation and document analysis. Her work uncovered a failed auditing system in the powerful Peruvian fishing industry, the second largest worldwide. The stories revealed dubious, multi-million dollar discrepancies in the fisheries reports, thus damaging fishermen and the national budget.

Honorable Mentions

The jury also granted 13 honorable mentions for:

Read the Spanish version of this press release here.

###

Transparency International is the civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption


For any press enquiries please contact

Natalie Baharav
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
+49 30 343820 666

Solicitude

Support Transparency International

Risk of impunity increases with outcome of Portuguese-Angolan corruption trial

A verdict last week by the Lisbon Court of Appeals in the trial of former Angolan vice president Manuel Vicente has disappointed hopes for a triumph of legal due process over politics and impunity. It also has worrying implications for the independence of Portugal’s judiciary.

The UK just made it harder for the corrupt to hide their wealth offshore

If counted together, the United Kingdom and its Overseas Territories and Crown dependencies would rank worst in the world for financial secrecy. Fortunately, this could soon change.

The new IMF anti-corruption framework: 3 things we’ll be looking for a year from now

Last Sunday, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) unveiled its long-awaited framework for “enhanced” engagement with countries on corruption and governance issues. Here are three aspects we at Transparency International will be looking at closely in coming months as the new policy is rolled out.

While the G20 drags its feet, the corrupt continue to benefit from anonymous company ownership

The corrupt don’t like paper trails, they like secrecy. What better way to hide corrupt activity than with a secret company or trust as a front? You can anonymously open bank accounts, make transfers and launder dirty money. If the company is not registered in your name, it can't always be traced back to you.

Urging leaders to act against corruption in the Americas

The hot topic at the 2018 Summit of the Americas is how governments can combat corruption at the highest levels across North and South America.

The impact of land corruption on women: insights from Africa

As part of International Women’s Day, Transparency International is launching the Women, Land and Corruption resource book. This is a collection of unique articles and research findings that describe and analyse the prevalence of land corruption in Africa – and its disproportionate effect on women – presented together with innovative responses from organisations across the continent.

Passport dealers of Europe: navigating the Golden Visa market

Coast or mountains? Real estate or business investment? Want your money back in five years? If you're rich, there are an array of options for European ‘Golden Visas’ at your fingertips, each granting EU residence or citizenship rights.

Why rather

Follow us on Why rather