The week in corruption: 7 stories making the news

The week in corruption: 7 stories making the news


The Economist

“Threats to democratic rule in Africa are growing, but time and demography are against the autocrats."


Reuters

“Some UK shell companies under offshore control may be skirting new rules which were designed to clamp down on corruption and tax evasion by forcing businesses to reveal their true owners, a Reuters analysis of corporate filings shows."


Bloomberg

“Paul Manafort, the campaign chairman for U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, should be questioned by Ukrainian investigators over almost [US]$13 million he allegedly received from a secret account for working on behalf of toppled President Viktor Yanukovych, a lawmaker said."


Reuters

“Ukrainian efforts to stamp out tax evasion and corruption among public officials in line with commitments to the IMF hit a setback on Monday when a new online income declaration system flopped at launch."


The Guardian

“Gold is Peru’s primary export, worth an estimated [US]$3bn (£2.3bn), yet violence, corruption, laundering and exploitation – including debt bondage, human trafficking and child labour – within the industry are rife across Latin America’s illegal gold mines."


VOA

“Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak is facing a challenge from one of the country's former leaders, as his administration tries to fend off allegations of corruption over misusing a multi-billion dollar development fund."


The Guardian

“Brothers of ex-army chief linked to two of three DHA developments being investigated by National Accountability Bureau."

Rio Olympics spotlight


BBC

“Police in Brazil have arrested the head of the European Olympic Committees, Irishman Patrick Hickey, in Rio over illegal Olympic ticket sales."


Associated Press

“The International Olympic Committee has stripped Russia of its gold medal in the women’s 4x100m from the 2008 Beijing Olympics after one of the runners tested positive in a re-analysis of her doping samples."


The New York Times

“Several referees and judges have been removed from the Olympic boxing competition after officials reviewed their decisions, fueling suspicion of dubious results in some matches at the Rio Games. "


Deutsche Welle

“No public funds. Brazil's judiciary has taken action. After numerous corruption scandals, prosecutors have now set their sights on the 2016 Olympic Organizing Committee."

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