Tackling corruption in Bangladesh

Tackling corruption in Bangladesh

Corruption is an everyday burden in Bangladesh. Perceptions, as well as public experiences of corruption are high in the country, with 66 percent of the population reporting that they have had to pay a bribe to access basic services in the last 12 months, and 46 per cent believing that corruption has increased.

Bangladesh ranks 120th place with a score of 2.7 in Transparency International’s , tied with Ecuador, Iran and Kazakhstan.

Corruption was perceived to be greatest in institutions that interact with the public: the police and public officials. This is worrisome, because corruption hits the poorest people hardest. Out of a population of 148.7 million, around of Bangladeshis live under the poverty line.  

TI-Bangladesh: engaging people in the corruption fight

94 per cent of people in Bangladesh agree that ordinary people can make a difference in the fight against corruption.

Since its establishment in 1996, has in both the public and the private spheres of society.

In fulfilling its to “catalyze and strengthen a participatory social movement to promote and develop institutions, laws and practices for combating corruption in Bangladesh”, TI-Bangladesh has created numerous civic engagement initiatives:

Our chapter in action

On June 2, TI-Bangladesh organized a two-day national convention on “”, where it was highlighted that people’s collective courage is vital in fighting corruption. Sultana Kamal, chairman of the TI-Bangladesh trustee board, said that “every citizen is obliged to take his or her stance against corruption, as the responsibility for corruption and rights violation committed through the state machinery eventually lies with the people”.

On April 9 TI-Bangladesh on the challenges of good governance in the use of

On December 9, was celebrated in Bangladesh through public rallies in many Bangladeshi cities, where people wearing identical green T-shirts demanded good governance and effective control of corruption.

TI-Bangladesh in the news

The Daily Star:

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