Stopping Dirty Money: the Global Effective-O-Meter

Stopping Dirty Money: the Global Effective-O-Meter

This feature was updated on 7 February, 2018 in order to reflect the latest FATF reports.

About the Global Effective-O-Meter

Large-scale corruption schemes are only feasible if there’s a way to hide and spend the proceeds.

Cases from Azerbaijan and to  and have shown how corrupt networks are able to open bank accounts, transfer funds across borders and acquire prime real estate and luxury goods in global capitals.

Since 2014, a global anti-money laundering body called the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) has been whether countries’ measures to stop dirty money are actually working in practice – whether they are effective – in addition to the extent to which laws are in place on paper.

To date, it has assessed 46 countries across the world.  As the Effective-O-Meter shows, average global anti-money laundering effectiveness stands at just 32 per cent. This means that most countries fail to prevent corrupt individuals and their professional enablers from stealing money and getting away with it, at to citizens.

Overall, just seven countries score above 50 per cent:  the USA, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Australia, Portugal and Sweden. However, even these relative high-scorers are below the 70 per cent mark.

We will continue to update this page as new FATF reports and effectiveness scores become available.  

Most recent countries with FATF assessments published: , , .

As of February 2018, global effectiveness at stopping money laundering stands at 32%.

 

Methodology note

The Effective-O-Meter and effectiveness map draw on country effectiveness ratings across 11 “immediate outcomes” available from FATF .

The 4-point qualitative scale used by FATF to measure effectiveness has been converted to a numerical scale following the system suggested by the OECD :
Low effectiveness (LE): 0;
Moderate effectiveness (ME): 1;
Substantial Effectiveness (SE): 2;
High Effectiveness (HE): 3.

The unweighted average effectiveness score for each country across all 11 FATF immediate outcomes has been expressed as a percentage of the highest possible score (3: high effectiveness). The global effectiveness score is an unweighted average of the scores for all available countries.

Images: Transparency International

For any press enquiries please contact [email protected]

Solicitude

Support Transparency International

A redefining moment for Africa

The newly released Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) provides a good baseline for the African Union (AU) anti-corruption efforts in 2018. This year’s theme for the AU is “Winning the Fight against Corruption: A Sustainable Path to Africa’s Transformation.” As the AU rolls out its plan, this is an important moment for Africa to take stock of the current situation.

Perceptions remain unchanged despite progress in the Americas

In the last few years, Latin America and the Carribbean made great strides in the fight against corruption. Laws and mechanisms exist to curb corruption, while legal investigations are advancing and citizen anti-corruption movements are growing in many countries across the region. However, according to the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) 2017, the region continues to score poorly for corruption. How can we explain this contradiction?

Slow, Imperfect Progress across Asia Pacific

While no country in the Asia Pacific region scores a perfect 100, not even New Zealand or Singapore, which both experienced their share of scandals in the last year, our analysis reveals little progress across the region.

Europe and Central Asia: more civil engagement needed

In 2017, authoritarianism rose across Eastern and South East Europe, hindering anti-corruption efforts and threatening civil liberties. Across the region, civil society organisations and independent media experienced challenges in their ability to monitor and criticise decision-makers

Rampant Corruption in Arab States

In a region stricken by violent conflicts and dictatorships, corruption remains endemic in the Arab states while assaults on freedom of expression, press freedoms and civil society continue to escalate.

Digging deeper into corruption, violence against journalists and active civil society

To mark the release of the Corruption Perceptions Index 2017, we analysed corruption levels around the world and looked at how they relate to civil liberties – specifically, the ability of citizens to speak out in defence of their interests and the wider public good.

Corruption Perceptions Index 2017

This year’s Corruption Perceptions Index highlights that the majority of countries are making little or no progress in ending corruption, while journalists and activists in corrupt countries risk their lives every day in an effort to speak out.

Why rather

Follow us on Why rather

Would you like to know more?

Sign up to stay informed about corruption news and our work around the world