Slideshow: Inside our hackathon in Rwanda

Slideshow: Inside our hackathon in Rwanda

From 1-2 June 2013 in Kigali, Rwanda, 33 developers worked for 36 hours on tech tools to help solve problems faced by Transparency International chapters in Burundi, , , and . The Hackathon was hosted by Transparency International jointly with Rwandan tech hub . The Rwanda hackathon followed our first Hacks against Corruption event in Sub-Saharan Africa, which was held in December 2012 in Nairobi, Kenya.

  • Thirty-three Rwandan ICT (Internet and Communication Technology) students and anti-corruption specialists worked together to find practical solutions to the challenges faced by our chapters while fighting corruption.

  • Holy Razafindrandretsa presents Transparency International Madagascar's problem statement. The chapter wanted a tool to help people report corruption anonymously.

  • Saliou Diop from Senegal sought a solution from Rwandan IT experts: a tool serving the fight against corruption in the road transport sector.

  • Ella Ndikumana of our chapter, ABUCO Burundi, explains what her chapter is hoping for from the Rwandan hackers. She wanted a tool to help people living in remote areas access her organisation's advocacy and legal advice centres.

  • Rajen Bablee, from our chapter in Mauritius, was looking for a whistleblowing ICT tool. The hackers gather details on the needs, and then split into small groups to develop solutions.

  • Thirteen groups of hackers worked to provide ICT solutions to our francophone African chapters.

  • The hackers work in an all-night 'sprint' to develop a prototype.

  • When the hacking ends, the developers present their progress to the attendees.

  • Rwanda's Minister of Youth and ICT, Jean Philbert Nsengimana, met the developers during the long night of hacking and chaired the award ceremony along with our Rwandan chapter's Chair, Marie-Immaculee Ingabire.

  • Third Prize Winners

    Gilbert Ndayisenga, Joseph Manzi and Patrick Niyonsaba worked on a solution to a problem statement from Burundi. Their solution allows people to report cases of bad service delivery and give further details by filling out a questionnaire. Government offices will receive information about cases concerning their institutions and departments (but will not be able to ascertain the identity of the person behind the report).

  • Second Prize Winners

    Sabine Dukuze and Jeanne Yamfashije worked on a tool to solve a problem statement from Rwanda. The La Loupe Rwanda tool lets people rate the service quality of institutions and departments through SMS, green line and a touch screen tool. The goal is to generate reports for all services provided by public sector institutions.

  • First Prize Winners

    Pascal Tuyishime, Christa Munezero and Jean Claude Mugenzi built the NOZA Rwanda web- and SMS-based application allowing people to anonymously report problems with service delivery by public agencies.

 

All images by Transparency International / Saran Koly

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