Our new global talk series on climate finance integrity

From Mexico City to Johannesburg to Bangkok, this year we are holding a series of talks across the globe on how to ensure that investment in the response to climate change really works, and is not undercut by corruption. Our global climate team has been analysing risks in the climate sector, and now we’re hoping to bring the right people to the table to discuss practical ways of overcoming them.

A number of these events will take place in Berlin – home to some of the most progressive environmental policy of recent years and its architects, one of the world’s largest contributors to climate finance, and a train’s ride away from the secretariat. The Berlin Climate Finance Integrity Talks series was designed to cut across sectors and disciplines and provide a non-politicised forum for climate policy-makers and practitioners to come together to jointly craft solutions to the problems that are already arising or anticipated.

The purpose of this event series is to mete out some practical yet ambitious solutions to the challenges we face. Challenges to ensure that those with entrusted power for deciding how much and for whom climate money should be spent are accountable for their decisions. Challenges to ensure that public money is not wasted, mismanaged or disappearing into offshore bank accounts. Challenges to ensure that every penny in already stretched public purses is spent with integrity and achieves genuine results toward avoiding serious climate change.”

– Opening address by Lisa Elges, Team Leader of our Climate Finance Integrity Programme

Watch excerpts from the first talk in our Berlin series here

Focus of the series

These are just some of the questions that our talk series is touching upon. The latest in the series was held in Berlin from 9-10 September, dedicated to exploring options for strengthening citizen participation in climate project design and monitoring, as well as the various models for supportive complaints mechanisms for when things go wrong.

Panel discussion in Berlin

Resources

For any press enquiries please contact [email protected]

Solicitude

Support Transparency International

La Justicia española debe investigar el lavado de imagen de Azerbaiyán en Europa

Tres políticos españoles —Pedro Agramunt, Agustín Conde Bajén y Jordi Xuclá— se encuentran entre los delegados ante la Asamblea Parlamentaria del Consejo de Europa (APCE) sobre los que pesan sospechas de haberse beneficiado con la maniobra del “Laundromat”.

Clean up Spain – Justice for Azerbaijan’s reputation laundering in Europe

In Azerbaijan, critical voices are routinely suppressed. Meanwhile in Europe, politicians suspected of helping whitewash Azerbaijan’s record on human rights enjoy impunity. Join our campaign to urge authorities in Spain to investigate.

Everything you need to know about the 18th International Anti-Corruption Conference (#18IACC)

The #18IACC will take place from 22-24 October in Copenhagen, Denmark under the theme Together for Development, Peace and Security: Now is the Time to Act. Get the latest info and updates here!

Risky business: Europe’s golden visa programmes

Are EU Member States accepting too much risk in their investor migration schemes?

Future Against Corruption Award 2018

TI is calling on young people across the globe to join the anti-corruption movement. People between the age of 18 and 35 are invited to submit a short video clip presenting their idea on new ways to fight corruption. Three finalists will be invited to Berlin during the International Anti-Corruption Day festivities to be awarded with the Future Against Corruption Award.

The Azerbaijani Laundromat one year on: has justice been served?

In September last year, a massive leak of bank records from 2012 to 2014 showed that the ruling elite of Azerbaijan ran a $3 billion slush fund and an international money laundering scheme. One year on, has enough been done to hold those involved to account?

Right to information: knowledge is power

The right to information is vital for preventing corruption. When citizens can access key facts and data from governments, it is more difficult to hide abuses of power and other illegal activities - governments can be held accountable.

Why rather

Follow us on Why rather