Anti-corruption: Changing China

Anti-corruption: Changing China

China is now well into the second year of its aggressive war against corruption. The ruling Communist Party has committed to the cause and put many more behind bars. But as Wang Qishan – a senior leader of the Central Commission for Discipline and Inspection, the agency mandated to tackle corruption – last week, the Party faces severe challenges to change behaviours that have become so much a part of everyday life.

From the perspective of an anti-corruption organisation, this is not surprising. Despite the fact that there has been a widespread information campaign to denounce corruption and teach integrity, there is a legitimate concern about how the Communist Party’s war on corruption is being waged.

There is a lack of independence of the judiciary, a lack of clarity on what constitutes corruption, and a lack of transparency in the process of prosecuting wrongdoing.

Hundreds of people have been arrested for corruption from low-level civil servants to and big multinationals like have been prosecuted. It is difficult not to see some of the high-profile arrests as being politically motivated. Too often corruption investigations take place , often in specially designed, padded interrogation centres, and more often than not, those arrested confess.

can find themselves the subject of investigation simply for speaking out on asset declarations. Government officials simply disappear from their day jobs when the corruption police show up and never return to work. are on the rise and the number of people China because of corruption is increasing.

This week the authorities of one of China’s top generals following a bribery scandal.

The greater number of stories in the national and international press about corruption in the past year in China is only likely to increase people’s perception that corruption is rampant, even if the authorities are seen to be tackling it.

A Reform Agenda

As part of its 4th Plenum, the Communist Party dedicated a whole day to a discussion about the judiciary, which is controlled by the Party, and its relation to the anti-corruption agenda.

The Party announced to make what constitutes corruption clearer and it reiterated that the fight is far from over. But they do not go far enough.

Transparency International does not agree with the death penalty as a punishment for corruption or any crimes, but this is still used in China, although the number of crimes that are subject to the death penalty dropped from 71 to 46 in the last two years. There is also a two-strand legal system: Party members laws, which supersede the penal code so there is no single legal standard.

The Communist Party will not create an independent judiciary, something that Transparency International advocates in the fight against corruption, but a move to introduce clarity and consistency in what constitutes corruption is welcome.

Transparency International suggests further key reforms:

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Editor's note: This article was amended on 31 October to note that the Citizens' Fixed Assets Registration project is being piloted in two cities in Guangdong province.

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