Annual report 2011

Annual report 2011

It was the year when the fight against corruption hit the headlines, and stayed there.

In 2011, demonstrations unfurled across the world – from the Middle East to Wall Street – demanding leadership that was accountable, fair and just. Calls for financial transparency grew, as instability continued to rock global markets, and corruption scandals emerged from international corporations. And the drive for open government took on new momentum, propelled by rapid developments in mobile technology.

A lot can happen in 12 months.

Transparency International is active in more than 100 countries, and our Annual Report provides a snapshot of how we tackled corruption in 2011. From sports cars seized in Paris to the fight for transparency in climate finance, it’s a record of how we grew, how we developed, and how we moved closer to achieving the aims laid out in our Strategy 2015.

Our activities, like our movement, were diverse. We engaged the youth in the fight against corruption – from an international summer school in Lithuania to student competitions in Palestine – and called on global leaders to end impunity for asset theft. We safeguarded billions of dollars of public money through integrity pacts in procurement, and helped communities develop new techniques to uphold their rights – from social audits to social media, from street theatre to filmmaking.

Underpinning all of these efforts was our vision: a world in which politics, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption. Find out how we’re turning it into a reality.

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